Biophysics

Ecological Bulletins No. 51, Targets and Tools for the by Per Angelstam, Monica Donz-Breuss, Jean-Michel Roberge

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By Per Angelstam, Monica Donz-Breuss, Jean-Michel Roberge

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The other route has been the development of forest related indicators in the context of broader sustainable development objectives of different international organisations such as the UN Commission on Sustainable Development (CSD), the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the World Bank, UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the UN Convention to Combat Desertification (CCD).

Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver. Whittaker, e. and Innes, ]. 2001c. Workshop proceedings 3, BorNet Canadian workshop in Prince George Be. - Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver. , Persson, R. and Schlaepfer, R. 2004. The sustainable forest management vision and biodiversity - barriers and bridges for implementation in actual landscapes. Ecol. Bull. 51: 29-49. Sustainable Forest Management (SFM) represents a vision for the use offorests based on satisfYing ecological, economic and social values.

To sustain these values active management of protected areas is often needed. Because the cover and types of forests and woodland are dynamic, including both degradation and restoration related to socio-economic changes (Nilsson et al. 1992, Bengtsson et al. 2003), monitoring and assessment of SFM should encompass geographically contiguous units representing actual landscapes, such as grid cells or preferably whole watersheds. Such areas, hereafter called landscapes, have a wide range of implementing actors ranging from the responsible bureaucrats, forest managers, wood processing industry, small private landowners and commons.

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