Biophysics

Functional Surfaces in Biology: Adhesion Related Phenomena by Stanislav Gorb (auth.), Prof. Stanislav N. Gorb (eds.)

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By Stanislav Gorb (auth.), Prof. Stanislav N. Gorb (eds.)

This booklet is dedicated to the quickly growing to be quarter of technology facing constitution and homes of organic surfaces of their relation to specific function(s). This quantity, written through a workforce of experts from diversified disciplines, covers numerous floor services resembling safety, security, water shipping, anti-wetting, self cleansing, mild mirrored image and scattering, and acoustics. simply because organic surfaces have an almost unending power of technological principles for the improvement of latest fabrics and platforms, inspirations from biology may be attention-grabbing for a huge variety of subject matters in floor engineering.

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Lividus (Fig. , 1994; Hennebert unpubl. ). , 230 nm in A. rubens and 100 nm in P. , 2005). It suggests that footprints in their native state may be swollen compared to dried footprints. On the other hand, these measurements were made on different substrata (epoxy resin and glass, respectively), and it is known that substratum properties may influence the thickness and bulk properties of bioadhesives. , 2004). , 2005, for review). This protein forms an elongated, flexible film with substantial amounts of hydrodynamically coupled water on non-polar surfaces, whereas it forms a rigidly attached adlayer with little hydrodynamically coupled water on polar surfaces.

11). , 2005; Kamino, 2006, respectively). The thickness of the fibrillar matrix may vary from one footprint to another but also between different areas of the same footprint (Fig. , 2008). In sea stars, the fibrils tend to form a loose meshwork with relatively large meshes, about 2 to 5 μm in diameter (Figs. 11). The walls delimiting the meshes may be quite thick (up to 1 μm) and, under the AFM, they appear as strings of little beads (Fig. , 2008). In sea urchin and sea cucumber footprints, the meshwork appears denser, with smaller meshes (<1 μm) delimited by very fine fibrils (about 50 nm in diameter) (Fig.

V. (2009) First insights into the biochemistry of tube foot adhesive from the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus (Echinoidea, Echinodermata). 1007/s10126-009-9182-5. , and Flammang, P. (2005a) Adhesion of echinoderm tube feet to rough surfaces. J Exp Biol 208: 2555–2567. , and Flammang, P. (2005b). The tube feet of sea urchins and sea stars contain functionally different mutable collagenous tissues. J Exp Biol 208: 2277–2288. , and Flammang, P. (2005c) Comparative histological and immunohistochemical study of sea star tube feet (Echinodermata, Asteroidea).

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