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Ladino Rabbinic Literature and Ottoman Sephardic Culture by Matthias B. Lehmann

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By Matthias B. Lehmann

During this pathbreaking e-book, Matthias B. Lehmann explores Ottoman Sephardic tradition in an period of switch via an in depth learn of popularized rabbinic texts written in Ladino, the vernacular language of the Ottoman Jews. This vernacular literature, status on the crossroads of rabbinic elite and renowned cultures and of Hebrew and Ladino discourses, sheds useful mild at the modernization of Sephardic Jewry within the jap Mediterranean within the nineteenth century. by way of supporting to shape a Ladino examining public and presenting form to its values, the authors of this literature negotiated among perpetuating rabbinic culture and addressing the demanding situations of modernity. The publication bargains shut readings of works that learn concerns akin to social inequality, exile and diaspora, gender, secularization, and the conflict among medical and rabbinic wisdom. Ladino Rabbinic Literature and Ottoman Sephardic tradition should be welcomed through students of Sephardic in addition to eu Jewish heritage, tradition, and faith.

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Ladino Rabbinic Literature and Ottoman Sephardic Culture

During this pathbreaking booklet, Matthias B. Lehmann explores Ottoman Sephardic tradition in an period of swap via a detailed research of popularized rabbinic texts written in Ladino, the vernacular language of the Ottoman Jews. This vernacular literature, status on the crossroads of rabbinic elite and well known cultures and of Hebrew and Ladino discourses, sheds invaluable gentle at the modernization of Sephardic Jewry within the jap Mediterranean within the nineteenth century.

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Extra info for Ladino Rabbinic Literature and Ottoman Sephardic Culture

Sample text

Part of the broad attraction to Sabbatean messianism and the longing for redemption was clearly a re®ection of the declining fortunes of Ottoman Jewry. In addition, in the aftermath of the Spanish expulsion, messianic expectations had been an important feature of Ottoman Jewish culture, and the messianic branch of Lurianic Kabbalah, though probably not widely popularized in the generation prior to Sabbatai Sevi, also played an important role. What seems most remarkable about this episode, however, is the sheer range of the messianic excitement and the speed with which both followers and opponents of Sabbatai Sevi exchanged information about the movement and were aware of developments in far-away communities.

On the other hand, however, it bears witness to the perceived necessity to collect their traditions and make them available for a broader reading public in order to preserve the cultural heritage of a community uprooted and dislocated by the expulsion. Printing extant works of rabbinic Judaism was not the only contribution of Ottoman Jewry in the sixteenth century, however. Both in terms of Jewish law and Jewish mysticism, Ottoman Safed in the century after the expulsion from Spain brought forward major original contributions that have shaped the outlook of traditional Judaism in subsequent centuries.

31 Huli does not promote an ideology of piousness but seeks to inform the masses about their religious duties, the halakhic standards which the average person is expected to meet. A century later, Eli"ezer Papo expresses the same educational ideal in the Hebrew version of the Pele Yo"ets: “There are now many ignoramuses who do not understand the holy tongue. . The one who wishes to bene¤t Israel should undertake to write prayer books, compendia of law (qitsure dinim), and books of ethical instruction in the vernacular, which is better than to publish books of learned discussions ( pilpulim) or homiletics (derushim) .

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